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Writing Workshops

In the writing world, continuing education is crucial. Hire our team of creative writers and college professors to sharpen your team's communication skills.

Every brand is made up of many individual voices. Whether your team includes sales professionals, marketing experts, or neither of those two, their collective written communication skills can mean the difference between a clear message and a murky mess. With college degrees in writing and teaching experience at the college level, the creative writers at Metonymy Media understand how to train professionals of all skill levels to write more confidently and more effectively.

We offer a slate of writing courses, plus lunch and learns and even customizable private coaching services to help any writer of any level improve their skills. Come to us for training in basic writing and grammar, for improved internal communications, or even for help in writing effective marketing content on your blog, social media accounts, and website.

The following courses are currently available on-demand (at your location or ours):

Grammar & Style Crash Course

Business Writing Workshop

Blog Writing Workshop

Brand Storytelling Workshop

Content Marketing Workshop

Below find a few related blog posts to help you wrestle with some new ideas about writing and a free download of the Metonymy Media Desk Reference to help you write with more confidence starting immediately.

Ready to schedule your workshop? Contact us today.

Creative writers, telling your story, helping you grow. That’s Metonymy Media.

Even the most seasoned writers occasionally need a quick refresher to make their way through a tough sentence. Do I use a semicolon or a colon here? Should this be "effect" or "affect?" What's the difference between a dash and a hyphen? Download a free copy of the Metonymy Media Desk Reference—our short collection of writing rules and those tricky grammar things that most often throw our own writers off their A-game—and get the quick answers you need, whatever you're writing. Better yet, print that bad boy out and tape it to your monitor.